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The Tenth Candi at Gunung Kawi - Ancient Balinese Temple - Bali, Indonesia by Daniel Ritchie

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Taken by
Daniel Ritchie Daniel Ritchie
Explore score
12
Size
0.28 Gigapixels
Views
374
Date added
Nov 19, 2011
Date taken
Jul 06, 2010
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Description

This candi, the tenth in the complex is infrequently photographed because it takes a bit of extra work to get to it. I have only been able to find a few pictures...safe to say this is the only GigaPan.

The city of Ubud was made famous in Eat, Pray, Love. 18km away (accessible by motorscooter for $3.50/day rental cost) is the ancient temple Gunung Kawi. The translation is “The Mountain of the Poets” or “Mountain of Poetry”. The area was most likely developed in the 10th and 11th century.

Gunung Kawi turned out to have a look and feel like nothing else I had seen in Bali; the structures were much different than other Balinese architecture. The setting was in a lush valley surrounded by rice terraces. It was beautiful, peaceful, and had a unique spiritual feel to it.

The complex houses ten candis (structures carved into a rock wall, to act as places for the spirits they represent to return to). They are very large, about twenty-five feet tall. Nine of them are fairly easy to access (believed to be for a king, his four wives who likely threw themselves on his funeral pyre, and his four concubines). The tenth candi is about a kilometer away down and unmarked trail. Some say this was for the king himself, or his priest, or someone else unknown. On my way to explore the last tomb, I was greeted by children yelling “Hallo” from the rice terraces across the valley. I waved and yelled back.

The locals call the tenth tomb “The Priest’s House” and some believe it to have been a monestary…but nobody really knows. If not the priest, it's also possible that it was for the son of the father whom these were likely built for. A half-finished blog entry with a few more details can be found here:
www.thebluebackpack.com/blog/2010/07/07/ubud-bali-indonesia Will open in a new tab or window/


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Stitcher Notes

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GigaPan Stitch version 1.0.0805 (Windows)
Panorama size: 278 megapixels (34144 x 8168 pixels)
Input images: 52 (13 columns by 4 rows)
Field of view: 183.6 degrees wide by 43.9 degrees high (top=32.6, bottom=-11.4)
Settings:
Use larger blending region
Original image properties:
Camera make: SONY
Camera model: DSC-TX5
Image size: 3648x2736 (10.0 megapixels)
Capture time: 2010-07-06 15:38:26 - 2010-07-06 15:43:18
Aperture: f/4.6
Exposure time: 0.04 - 0.2
ISO: 400
Focal length (35mm equiv.): unknown
White balance: Automatic
Exposure mode: Automatic
Horizontal overlap: 27.8 to 38.1 percent
Vertical overlap: 33.2 to 34.1 percent
Computer stats: 16367.1 MB RAM, 8 CPUs
Total time 37:07 (43 seconds per picture)
Alignment: 13:19, Projection: 4:04, Blending: 19:45
(Preview finished in 27:46)

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