1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar


Saint Francis Cathedral - Santa Fe, NM by Thomas Hayden

Want to add this gigapan to your favorites? Log In or Sign Up now.

Log In now to add this Gigapan to a group gallery.

About This Gigapan

Toggle
Taken by
Thomas Hayden Thomas Hayden
Explore score
1
Size
2.66 Gigapixels
Views
440
Date added
Nov 16, 2010
Date taken
Sep 30, 2010
Gear

Canon PowerShot S5IS

Categories
 
Galleries
Competitions
Tags
Description

Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, commonly known as Saint Francis Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico. It is the mother church of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe.

Go inside the Cathedral in this 360 pano in Photosynth - photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=c6b1c4f4-3e41-47a2-97e5-52ad14738131&m=false&i=0:0:0&c=0:0:0&z=672.5&d=-1.45079336398978:0.120677336917328:0.135612827639836&p=0:0&t=False Will open in a new tab or window
Stand outside the front door in this 360 pano on Bing Maps - www.bing.com/maps/explore/#/254q0hyr14qccd18 Will open in a new tab or window
Composed of over 1000 images, this shot is admittedly a bit dark, but a storm was blowing in as the images were being taken. The batteries in my Epic 100 were changed twice during shooting and I apparently shifted the camera's position slightly, causing a shift that shows up in the stiching.

The cathedral was built by Archbishop Jean Baptiste Lamy between 1869 and 1886 on the site of an older adobe church, La Parroquia (built in 1714-1717). An even earlier church on the same site, built in 1626, had been destroyed in the 1680 Pueblo Revolt. The new cathedral was built around La Parroquia, which was dismantled once construction was complete. A small chapel on the north side of the cathedral is all that remains of the old church.

Influenced by the French-born Archbishop Lamy and in dramatic contrast to the surrounding adobe structures, Saint Francis Cathedral was designed in the Romanesque Revival style. As such, the cathedral features characteristic round arches separated by Corinthian columns and truncated square towers. The large rose window in front and those of the Twelve Apostles in the lateral nave windows were imported from Clermont-Ferrand in France. The towers were originally planned to be topped with dramatic 160-foot (49 m) steeples, but due to lack of funds these were never built. The left tower is in fact a single row of bricks taller than the right tower. The cathedral was built from yellow limestone blocks quarried near the present site of Lamy. A 2005 addition to the upper facade of the cathedral is a small, round window featuring the dove of the Holy Spirit. It is a stained glass replica of the translucent alabaster window designed in the 17th Century by Italian Baroque artist Bernini that can be seen in St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City.

The Cathedral of Saint Francis of Assisi was officially elevated to a basilica by Pope Benedict XVI on October 4, 2005, becoming the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi.


Gigapan Comments (0)

Toggle Minimize gigapan_comment
The GigaPan EPIC Series, Purchase an GigaPan EPIC model and receive GigaPan Stitch complimentary

Where in the World is this GigaPan?

Toggle

Stitcher Notes

ToggleMinimize

GigaPan Stitch version 1.0.0805 (Windows)
Panorama size: 2659 megapixels (69368 x 38344 pixels)
Input images: 988 (38 columns by 26 rows)
Field of view: 90.5 degrees wide by 50.0 degrees high (top=33.0, bottom=-17.0)
Settings:
All default settings
Original image properties:
Camera make: Canon
Camera model: Canon PowerShot S5 IS
Image size: 3264x1832 (6.0 megapixels)
Capture time: 2010-10-01 01:13:33 - 2010-10-01 02:17:41
Aperture: f/6.3
Exposure time: 0.0125
ISO: 80
Focal length (35mm equiv.): 435.8 mm
Digital zoom: off
White balance: Fixed
Exposure mode: Manual
Horizontal overlap: 16.6 to 96.8 percent
Vertical overlap: 0.2 to 36.1 percent
Computer stats: 3002.45 MB RAM, 2 CPUs
Total time 7:13:31 (26 seconds per picture)
Alignment: 6:00:26, Projection: 8:12, Blending: 1:04:54
(Preview finished in 6:19:22)

Member Log In