1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar


One Dollar Bill (Tarnished), 8.6 Gigapixel Macro Photograph by Gene Cooper

Want to add this gigapan to your favorites? Log In or Sign Up now.

Log In now to add this Gigapan to a group gallery.

About This Gigapan

Toggle
Taken by
Gene Cooper Gene Cooper
Explore score
11
Size
8.64 Gigapixels
Views
8278
Date added
Aug 25, 2009
Date taken
Aug 24, 2009
Categories
 
Galleries
Competitions
Tags
Description

This photograph was constructed from 1,800 individual photographs using a new prototype macro photography robotic system. The technology combines focus stacking, stitching, and a robotic photo rig to create each gigapixel macro photograph. We look forward to developing collaborations and partnerships that will help us put the technology into the hands of the public and welcome your suggestions, comments, and feedback. Learn more about the technology at www.gigamacro.com Will open in a new tab or window/
The Department of the Treasury, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, redeems partially destroyed or badly damaged currency as a free public service. Every year the U.S. Treasury handles approximately 30,000 claims and redeems mutilated currency valued at over $30 million. The Office of Financial Management/Mutilated Currency Division, located in the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, uses experts to examine mutilated currency and will approve the issuance of a Treasury check for the value of the currency determined to be redeemable.

Here are a few interested facts that relate to the tarnished bill above...

Currency paper is composed of 25% linen and 75% cotton.

Red and blue synthetic fibers of various lengths are distributed evenly throughout the paper. Prior to World War I the fibers were made of silk.

Between the Fort Worth, Texas and the Washington, DC Facilities approximately 18 tons of ink per day are used.

During fiscal year (FY) 2008, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing produced approximately 38 million notes a day with a face value of approximately $629 million.

95% of the notes printed each year are used to replace notes already in, or taken out of circulation.

The approximate weight of a currency note, regardless of denomination is (1) one gram. There are 454 grams in one (1) U.S. pound, therefore, there should be 454 notes in (1) one pound(Avoirdupois system). If the troy system were used, there are (12) twelve ounces in (1) one pound; therefore, if one note weighs approximately (1) one gram, then (1) troy pound contains approximately 375 notes.

Have you ever wondered how many times you could fold a piece of currency before it would tear? About 4,000 double folds (first forward and then backwards) are required before a note will tear.

The average life span of a $1 bill is 21 months.

Information provided courtesy of the US Bureau of Engraving and Printing
www.bep.treas.gov Will open in a new tab or window/
We welcome your comments and hope you enjoy exploring the image!

Gene Cooper
Four Chambers Studio
www.fourchambers.org Will open in a new tab or window/
www.gigamacro.com Will open in a new tab or window/
gene@fourchambers.org Will open in a new tab or window


Gigapan Comments (0)

Toggle Minimize gigapan_comment
The GigaPan EPIC Series, Purchase an GigaPan EPIC model and receive GigaPan Stitch complimentary

Where in the World is this GigaPan?

Toggle
Sorry, this gigapan has no location information.

Member Log In