1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar


Mount Sharp Panorama in Raw Colors by JPL News

Want to add this gigapan to your favorites? Log In or Sign Up now.

Log In now to add this Gigapan to a group gallery.

About This Gigapan

Toggle
Taken by
JPL News JPL  News
Explore score
89
Print Pricing
$46.00 to $132.00
Size
0.12 Gigapixels
Views
50236
Date added
Mar 15, 2013
Date taken
 
Categories
 
Galleries
Competitions
Tags
Description

This mosaic of images from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows Mount Sharp in raw color as recorded by the camera. Raw color shows the scene's colors as they would look in a typical smart-phone camera photo, before any adjustment.

Mount Sharp, also called Aeolis Mons, is a layered mound in the center of Mars' Gale Crater, rising more than 3 miles (5 kilometers) above the crater floor, where Curiosity has been working since the rover's landing in August 2012. Lower slopes of Mount Sharp are the major destination for the mission, though the rover will first spend many more weeks around a location called "Yellowknife Bay," where it has found evidence of a past environment favorable for microbial life.

This mosaic was assembled from dozens of images from the 100-millimeter-focal-length telephoto lens camera mounted on the right side of the Mastcam instrument. The component images were taken during the 45th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's mission on Mars (Sept. 20, 2012). The sky has been filled out by extrapolating color and brightness information from the portions of the sky that were captured in images of the terrain.

A white-balanced version of the mosaic is available at This mosaic of images from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows Mount Sharp in raw color as recorded by the camera. Raw color shows the scene's colors as they would look in a typical smart-phone camera photo, before any adjustment.

Mount Sharp, also called Aeolis Mons, is a layered mound in the center of Mars' Gale Crater, rising more than 3 miles (5 kilometers) above the crater floor, where Curiosity has been working since the rover's landing in August 2012. Lower slopes of Mount Sharp are the major destination for the mission, though the rover will first spend many more weeks around a location called "Yellowknife Bay," where it has found evidence of a past environment favorable for microbial life.

This mosaic was assembled from dozens of images from the 100-millimeter-focal-length telephoto lens camera mounted on the right side of the Mastcam instrument. The component images were taken during the 45th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's mission on Mars (Sept. 20, 2012). The sky has been filled out by extrapolating color and brightness information from the portions of the sky that were captured in images of the terrain.

A white-balanced version of the mosaic is available at www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16768.html Will open in a new tab or window. White balancing makes the sky look overly blue, but shows the terrain as if under Earth-like lighting.

Curiosity's Mastcam was built and is operated by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSSl. White balancing makes the sky look overly blue, but shows the terrain as if under Earth-like lighting.

Curiosity's Mastcam was built and is operated by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS


Gigapan Comments (2)

Toggle Minimize gigapan_comment
  1. mkultra

    mkultra (March 20, 2013, 05:44PM )

    no it's not a flying witch, or bigfoot. it's just a spec of dust that shows up in every stitch. I dare you to spot them all. I gave up at around 30 (nearly one row) ps: I have no life

  2. JJ R2

    JJ R2 (March 19, 2013, 04:40PM )

    This is amusing: "Where in the World is this GigaPan? Sorry, this GigaPan has no location information."

Where in the World is this GigaPan?

Toggle
Sorry, this gigapan has no location information.

Member Log In